Tag Archives: religion

Origin by Dan Brown. Review 

I’m a huge fan of Dan Brown’s Books. I’ve read everything he’s published and can’t understand people who think the books are rubbish. They are so much more than just a story, they contain a wealth of information particularly about religion, symbols and science. Not to mention technology. And Origin is no different. 

Robert Langdon and his Mickey Mouse watch travel to Spain this time, to a presentation held by Robert’s ex student and friend Edmond Kirsch. Kirsch has announced that he plans to release a presentation which will answer the two fundamental questions people ask. Where did we come from? And Where are we going? 


His discovery threatens to rock the worlds of science and religion and change the way people view the world. But a perilous and chaotic moment prevent Edmond from revealing his discovery and the answers to his questions. Instead it’s up to Langdon and the museums beautiful director Ambra to find the presentation and reveal it to the world. With a little help from the mysterious Winston. 


Origin is action packed as the other novels in this series were but I felt that; perhaps in reflection of Langdon not getting any younger, the pace was slightly slower. Other than one dramatic moment he doesn’t have his usual escapades! Nevertheless, the story really intrigued me, as the two questions intrigued the fictional viewers, they also intrigue the reader who becomes deseperate to read on in order to get the answers. 


I loved the character of Langdon just as much as I always do and especially the amount I feel that I learn from these novels, while they are fictional, there’s also a lot of interesting fact finding going on in there too! 

We can only live in hope of a 6th Book! 

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September 2017 wrap up! 

It’s that time again! Yay! I really love doing the wrap up and getting the chance to look back on what I’ve read this month, what I’ve enjoyed etc. This month I read 22 books at a total of 8,149 pages which is less books but more pages than usual so still a win. I’m very competitive with myself in terms of how many books I read each month, but I seem to be averaging at around 20-25 books a month which is really good. Anyway, to the books! I won’t write a long post about each as there’s just too many but reviews for pretty much all of them can be found on my blog or goodreads if you’d like to know more. 

The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden  












I Know a Secret by Tess Gerritsen. Review. 

Tess Gerritsen is an author who I already respect and admire as an amazing crime thriller author. Her Rizzoli & Isles series about detective Jane Rizzoli and Medical Examiner Maura Isles have already taken the world by storm with a 12 book series plus short stories and a TV adaptation. 


I Know a Secret is the 12th and most recent novel in this series and I am pleased to say that it was as gripping and engaging as it’s predecessors. I loved getting back into the world of the two friends who couldn’t be more different and yet connect with each so well. 


I Know a Secret find the duo investigating a series of weird murders which the two Know are connected but cannot prove. As the plot thickens they have a suspect in mind but is he just that little bit too obvious? Meanwhile a mysterious girl haunts the funeral, she knows all the victims and she knows what their connection is, but there’s no way she’s ever going to tell her Secret. 


I can’t really say much more about the plot without giving anything away but I will say that there is more to it than meets the eye and secrets never stay buried! 

An excellent crime thriller, fast paced, intriguing and keeps you guessing until the end. 

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry. Review 

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry seems to have been the most talked about book of the year, people who I know are not regular readers have even read and raved about it. As usual I am a little late to the party thanks to my enormous reading pile, but I’ve finally read it. 

In all honesty I found it a little slow paced, while the writing is beautiful I often find that beautiful writing makes you read much slower. When I first started my own studies in writing I remember scoffing at the idea that people prefer to read speech, conversations etc. Rather than description and the narrator telling the story. Show don’t tell. It’s the first rule of writing school isn’t it? And this book I felt, does a lot more telling than showing which I guess is why I found it slow paced. 


There’s no denying that Sarah Perry is a great writer, her prose is beautiful and the story is interesting as it looks to a time when scientific discovery begins to battle not only religious piety but myth and legend as well. Not only this, the novel explores the human psyche, emotions and relationships in minute detail, and the way that as humans we blunder on breaking relationships and not knowing or even perhaps caring how we effect other people. In particular the character of Cora Seaborne who sees herself so much as a woman empowered, taking back her identity that she fails to see how her actions and words effect others. 


I thought that this book explored the concept of feminism very well, in believing in herself and her own rights to do as she pleased, Cora destroyed friendships and relationships completely unaware of the fact and somewhat resentful when she became so. 

It was weird in places but as I say, well explored and what are people if not a little on the strange side? 

Godsgrave by Jay Kristoff. Review 

And so dear reader, we pick up where we left off… 

I’ll end up talking like the narrator in these books if I keep losing myself in them this way! You can read my review of Nevernight on the following link, be aware that though this review holds no spoilers for Godsgrave it will contain some for Nevernight so if you’ve not read it yet, a) go and do so as soon as possible, and b) don’t read any further until you have. https://lifehasafunnywayofsneakinguponyou.wordpress.com/2017/09/08/nevernight-by-jay-kristoff-review/

Godsgrave picks up where Nevernight finished. Mia has become a blade through a fluke, defending the ministry from the harm threatened them by Ash one of Mia’s own friends and along the way inheriting a new dark passenger; Eclipse the wolf who previously belonged to the now deceased Lord Cassius. (Is it just me or does Dark Passenger just make you think of Dexter?) 


The story is split into two parts which eventually come together. One tells the tale of Mia’s current position as a Gladitor in a collegium, essentially a slave. Meanwhile the story backtracks to show how Mia got from the point of her initiation as a blade, to being a slave. I’m guessing if you know Mia at all, there is little doubt in your mind that her motive is as always revenge. 


Godsgrave and Nevernight are equally as fast paced. Kristoff’s unusual but effective use of footnotes prevents the need for masses of worldbuilding and character building in both books which allows the story to get on with the action and suspense. Have I come out with more questions than I went in with? Thousands. Have I got answers to any of the questions I had when I finished Nevernight? Nope. But then that’s what makes the reader want to read more after all, and I am now seriously excited for the final book in this trilogy!! 

The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden. Review. 

‘Almost midnight – that wicked, magic hour – on a night menaced by ice and storm and the abyss of the featureless sky.’

I absolutely adored The Bear and the Nightingale so I was so happy when I was granted a review copy of The Girl in the Tower thanks to Netgalley and Ebury publishing. 
No spoilers here for The Girl in the Tower but if you haven’t read The Bear and the Nightingale yet I would warn you that there are spoilers for that book here and you would be better reading my spoiler free review of that book here: https://lifehasafunnywayofsneakinguponyou.wordpress.com/2017/04/06/the-bear-and-the-nightingale-by-katherine-arden-review/

The Girl in the Tower picks up from the events which happened in The Bear and the Nightingale, first focusing on Sasha and Olga in Moscow as the Grand Prince prepares for war against the Tartars and Olga receives news about the death of her father, stepmother and her little sister Vasya. The reader of course knows that Vasya is not dead but has escaped to the Frost King’s cottage for shelter. 


We pick up with Vasya next as she tells the Frost King that she intends to travel the country and be free rather than allow the people in her village to force her into a convent or marriage. I was glad to see the return of Vasya’s fiery spirit. But when she arrived in Moscow masquerading as a boy, it is here that Vasya’s fiery spirit gets her into trouble. 


I enjoyed this book so much, I love learning about folklore particularly the folklore of Eastern Europe which is always so deliciously dark. Katherine Arden demonstrates incredible research about the spirits, demons, myths and legends and weaves them into a fantastic story which is not only interesting but believable. Vasya is a character who is very easy to empathise with, a woman in a man’s world destined for nothing but a convent or marriage to a man she does not want. Instead she shows herself as a fierce survivor full of determination. Though she sometimes hurts the ones she loves I find that I see this as their fault not hers, their refusal to understand her and their determination to live by social protocols makes her the proverbial black sheep and I really dig that! 

If you haven’t read this series already then you should certainly do so as soon as possible. I challenge anyone to not enjoy these books. 

Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon. Review 

Read no further if you haven’t read the first book Outlander as there will be spoilers from the first novel, but none from Dragonfly in Amber

I really enjoyed Outlander where I was swept into the world of Claire and Jamie Fraser. Claire travels back through time to the 1700s where she meets a young highlander Jamie Fraser who she falls in love with. These are hefty books but beautifully written with amazing language, wonderfully put together passages of language. 

We return to this world in Dragonfly in Amber but twenty years on, Claire is back in the 1960s with a grown up daughter, returning to Scotland to reveal several truths that will blow the worlds of those near to her wide open. But fear not avid readers, we return to Claire’s memories to find out what happened next in her love saga with Jamie.


This sequel has all the passion of the first book in the series but tinged with sadness, knowing that Claire is back in present day means that the reader is second guessing how this could have happened and what may happen next. Some of the old friends and foes return and in places it’s a case of life and death! It’s another bulky novel but it doesn’t feel that way because of how engrossed you become in the storyline and needing to know what happens next. 


From a historical fiction lover’s viewpoint, I was really enamoured with understanding the rising of ’44 and the historical perspective not only of Bonnie Prince Charlie who I had heard of but never really studied, but also the court of the Parisian King Louis and his followers. It was interesting to see how much more advanced the French were in those days than the English. For example, I’m sure this doesn’t count as a spoiler but there is a very funny scene where Claire’s French friend gets her to wax her legs and armpits and Jamie’s reaction to this is just hilarious. I can’t wait to start Voyager