Tag Archives: fiction

Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris. Review

Midnight Crossroad is the first in Charlaine Harris’ new series Midnight Texas. The town of Midnight is grateful for the Crossroad as it drives business from outsiders into the tiny hamlet. With only a nail bar, Gas station, diner, pawnbrokers and magic shop, the town is quiet with only a few residents, well known to each other. Manfred Bernardo an Internet psychic moves into the town and soon discovers that there’s something a little unusual about the townsfolk.

I really loved the concept of this novel, supernatural people all living together in a little hamlet, disturbed by white supremacy is about what sums it up which sounds ridiculous but it works!

I loved all the characters, some of them are open about their supernatural powers like Fiji the witch, while others like the Rev and Bobo are yet to be revealed, although I already have my suspicions. I am a huge fan of the Sookie Stackhouse series and Charlaine Harris does not disappoint with this latest series!

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Pieces of You by Ella Harper. Review

I must have heard about this book somewhere and liked the sound of it because it’s been on my tbr for a while and it’s not in my favourite genre or by an author I have read before and I’m pleased to say that I really enjoyed it. Although, due to the subject matter, I’m not sure ‘enjoyed’ is the correct term.

Lucy and Luke are the perfect couple, married for 5 years they are still best friends, and still very much in love. The only problem is, they can’t have a baby. After 8 miscarriages, Lucy is finally pregnant with their third attempt at IVF and now it’s approaching the 4 month mark, they’re starting to feel safe, like it’s finally happening for them. Then on their 5 year anniversary, their lives fall apart in ways they could never have imagined.

With Luke now in a coma, secrets begin to unravel and rear their ugly heads, leaving Lucy with the hardest decision of her life.

This novel is bittersweet in that it deals with lots of sadness, and heartbreak for many different reasons but also tells the story of an ordinary family, torn apart by extraordinary circumstances. Told from the perspectives of Lucy, Patricia (Luke’s Mum) and Nell (Luke’s sister), Pieces of You takes the reader on an unforgettable journey of heartbreak, loss, grief and most importantly, Love.

Tess of the D’Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy. Review

I find it really difficult to review classics, never quite feeling that I do them justice if I like them, and if I don’t like them, fearing that it is just because I’m missing the ‘point’. But hey, I’ll have a go, just to clarify Tess of the D’Urbervilles falls firmly into the category of a classic I liked.

Tess is the eldest daughter of the family Durbeyfield, when her father discovers they are descendants of the great family D’Urbeville who were knights in the time of the conqueror, Mrs Durbeyfield sends Tess off to plead Kinship with what she believes to be distant, rich relatives. But Tess’ ‘cousin’ Alec becomes her downfall and she returns home a few months later in shame.

After leaving her village due to her shame, Tess starts a new life as a dairymaid and meets the kind, considerate Angel Clare. Angel wants to marry Tess but her past haunts her and at first she tries to refuse, before eventually agrees. Prior to the wedding, she tried on many occasions to tell Angel about her past but he doesn’t want to hear it. On their wedding night she finally makes the decision to tell him and everything goes downhill from there.

This book deals with many issues, from Tess’ rape at the hands of Alec D’Urberville to her shame at returning home, to her attempts to make a new life for herself when she becomes an outcast in her village. I found a lot of the issues really interesting particularly when taken in context of the time in which this novel was written. For instance, I thought it was very well done, that on the wedding night, Angel confessed that when in London he had spent two days having sex with a woman (possibly a prostitute) but when Tess confesses she was raped he is disgusted and pulls away from her. Essentially, leaving her to the fate of which she is destined.

Tess is by no means a helpless woman. No, she doesn’t have the fire and drive of Hardy’s other heroine Bathsheba Everdene but she does have a drive to protect herself and her family which I admired and she always has her pride. But what she also does is make a series of bad decisions which made me want to scream at her while still appreciating that at the time the novel is set, she couldn’t have done much else.

Overall, I found the novel engrossing in a way I have never really found With classics, desiring to pick it up and continue reading at every opportunity. It is likely to now join the ranks of my favourite classics in leather bound hardback.

Into The Thinnest of Air by Simon R Green. Review.

Thank you to Netgalley, the publisher and Simon R Green for my ARC of Into the Thinnest of Air which is Book 5 in the Ishmael Jones series.

Penny and Ishmael are off to a fancy dinner with some of Penny’s father’s friends in Cornwall. Having just acquired The Castle, an inn fraught with rumour of the supernatural, Albert & Olivia are hosting a dinner party to be staged exactly like the one where hundreds of years ago, the innkeeper killed all his diners because of voices he was hearing in his head.

But things start to go wrong when one by one, the guests are picked off and disappear, but only when left alone. Most of them think the explanation lies within the supernatural world of ghosts and bogeymen, but Ishmael just isn’t convinced…

What I absolutely adore about the Ishmael Jones series is something I can’t really put my finger on. But since reading book 3 last year I’ve been hooked. I’ve tried to describe them to my partner but I get as far as ‘well it’s about an alien who has become a sort of detective in the human world’ and then realise I’m not doing it justice.

So all I can suggest is reading them for yourselves to really get the feel of why they’re so great, they’re such easy reads, designed to be devoured in one sitting. They’re funny, I love the relationship between Penny and Ishmael, I love that Ishmael can do loads of cool stuff because he’s an alien, but I also love that Penny, a human woman can also kick ass! I really need to get the 1st and 2nd Books read now.

The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge. Review

A unique blend of historical and fantasy fiction. The Lie Tree is one of a kind.

Faith and her family are moving to the island of Vane so that her father the Reverend Erasmus Sunderly can consult on a new archeological dig. To most people Faith seems shy and demure but inside she is burning with questions about the world and in particular science.

But when her father’s body is discovered Faith can not accept the ruling of suicide or accidental death, so she begins her own investigation and uncovers her father’s biggest secret; The Lie Tree.

The Tree feeds off lies and in return reveals secrets. Faith sees it as an opportunity to discover the secrets of her father’s death, but doesn’t realise she is putting herself into the same kind of danger.

A cross between a Victorian Murder mystery and a YA fantasy series. A truly brilliant piece of fiction which brings brand new ideas to the table.

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black. Review

Thank you to Netgalley, the publisher and Holly Black for my ARC of The Cruel Prince. If there’s anything in this world I love, its stories about fairies. Growing up I was obsessed with them, I had collections of picture books and of course the staple fairy book; The Complete Book of Flower Fairies by Cicely Mary Barker. My favourite film was Fairytale A True Story and I was convinced that I would be able to see them. Because I truly believed, and that’s all you need right? If you believe in Fairies, you’ll see them.

Holly Black follows in the footsteps of her friend Cassandra Clare in that her Fairies are not the sprightly, sweet, pink wearing Flower Fairies of Cicely Mary Barker’s compendiums. Instead they are dark, the Seelie and Unseelie courts, Lords and Ladies of Misrule, tempting humans into slavery with their narcotic spiked fruits, ensorcelling them with their commands and dark magic. That’s exactly what kind of world Jude and her sister Taryn walk into when their older sister Vivienne’s fairy Dad walks back into their lives and takes them to live in Faerie.

Jude has a lot to contend with, not only does she need to protect herself and her sister from the charms of the fey, she has also found an enemy in Prince Cardan, the youngest and cruelest prince who seems to be doing his best to make Jude’s life a misery.

But there are bigger players in this game, a game much larger and more complicated than child’s play. Somehow, Jude finds herself right in the middle of it. With everything to lose, she’s everything to play.

Dark, dangerous and deliciously deceitful. The Cruel Prince is an outstanding first novel in what I think will become an addictively good series.

The Girl With No Past by Kathryn Croft. Review

The Girl With No Past is the last of Kathryn’s currently published books that I have read and I loved it just as much as her others. Filled with suspense and Kathryn’s signature terrific twist, once again I found myself unable to put it down.

2014: Leah lives a simple life, she has a job at her local library, a simple home filled with more books than furniture and a volunteering position at the local library. But Leah is missing many things, like friendship, relationships and somewhere to truly call home. Because Leah is punishing herself, she believes that the horrors of her past mean she must live a frugal, simple life, devoid of happiness because she doesn’t deserve it.

2000: Leah and her boyfriend Adam and their friends Imogen and Corey are looking forward to a summer free of exams, school and overbearing parents. But Adam is the only one who doesn’t seem happy, he hates their teacher Miss Hollis with a passion bordering on obsession and it’s beginning to make Leah feel uncomfortable.

But now, somebody is stalking Leah, sending her emails, turning up at her house and moving things while she’s sleeping. Turning her new found friends against her. Leah begins investigating with the help of her friend Ben but before she can find the stalker, the stalker finds her.

The Girl With No Past is so tense and I really thought I’d worked out the twist this time but I couldn’t have been more wrong! Leah is a character who it easy to feel compassion for, despite her past, I think the title may be meant as irony because I feel that Leah really was a good person despite everything. Another unforgettable read.